Pregnant dog poisoned
Pregnant dog poisoned
Karnataka

Orphanage Manager In Bengaluru Arrested For ‘Poisoning Dogs’

Dogs were not poisoned intentionally, say police

Ankita Sengupta

Ankita Sengupta

The manager of an orphanage in JP Nagar has been arrested for causing the death of eight dogs in MS Ramaiah City, JP Nagar, on January 27. According to the police, the arrested accused had carried rotting food waste in his car and dumped it in the spot frequented by the stray dogs.

Speaking to The Lede, DCP South Rohini Katoch Sepat said, “According to the preliminary investigation, the dogs were not poisoned intentionally. The manager of the orphanage threw rotting food in the area which was consumed by the local stray dogs.”

“It appears that the rotting food resulted in the creation of a biological toxin which led to the death of the dogs. We are, however, waiting for the post-mortem examination report and further investigation is underway,” she added.

JP Nagar residents and animal rights activists, however, are not satisfied with the explanation. Activist Arun Prasad said, “It is difficult to believe that dogs who have a keen sense of smell and a more powerful digestive system than humans can eat rancid food. These are dogs that often scavenge for food, it is unlikely that they failed to detect that the food was unfit for consumption.”

Ramya Gowda, who had first approached the police with the case, said that the police’s narrative went against what the CCTV cameras in the area had captured. “In the footage, we can clearly see a car coming out of Universal Education Academy, and a packet being thrown out of it. In about a minute, stray dogs in the area were seen eating from it. If it was, in fact, waste food, why could it not have been thrown in the dustbin?” she said.

Ramya was also in attendance when the vets at Government Veterinary Hospital in Queens Road conducted the post-mortem examination. “The doctor told me that the toxin used in the food was so potent that bodily fluids were leaking from the corpses,” she said. “All the five dogs that ate the poisoned food first succumbed. Some of them puked before dying. The dogs that survived had barely eaten much from the packet, hence, they survived,” Ramya added.

Currently, four of the five dogs that were critical have recovered. One continues to be treated at the hospital.

Initial media reports suggested that a pregnant dog was part of the pack that was poisoned, Ramya — who was part of the rescue operation — clarified that it was not poisoned but assaulted.

“We had found the pregnant dog in the same area as the other dogs and so we rushed it to the vets as well. The doctors then told us that she had a broken backbone and it was likely that she was hit by something heavy,” she said.

The vets safely delivered seven puppies, but the dog succumbed due to “internal injuries”. The puppies, however, are healthy and are in foster homes. “We will put them up for adoption once they are a bit older,” said Ramya.

The poisoning incident had come to light on the morning of January 27 when a resident of Daffodils Apartment — who stepped out to take her dog out for a walk — in MS Ramaiah City, JP Nagar, found the dogs lying unconscious on the roadside. She then alerted others who rushed the dogs to a vet.

Bengaluru has been witnessing increasing instances of violence against dogs, especially in JP Nagar. On January 21, rescuers found a female dog tied to a tree and abandoned. It is currently in foster care.

The Lede
www.thelede.in